Genius Is Suing Google For $50 Million For Allegedly Stealing Lyrics

Google is being sued by Genius, the lyrics website, on the grounds that they have been continuously, and knowingly, copying their lyrics and using them in search results. When someone uses Google to search something pertaining to a song or its lyrics, the lyrics are usually the second visual right after a music video. Earlier this year, Genius made the claim that in some cases, the lyrics that are displayed are being copied from their website.

Of course, most people would wonder how Genius can tell that it’s their rendition of the lyrics since, essentially, it should be the same words across all lyrics website. Apparently, the website uses a watermarking system involving straight and curved apostrophes so they can tell their lyrics apart from others. In June 2019, with this as their support, Genius informed Google that they had broken their terms of service and that they were ultimately violating antitrust law. Google responded that they license their song lyrics from a variety of different sources.

Genius doesn’t have a copyright claim due to the fact that they don’t own the lyrics, however they do hold a license to print the song lyrics. Google also has this license, but how Google got these lyrics is still in question. 

Genius is now suing Google for $50 million in damages. On top of this, Genius is asking for a permanent injunction against another lyrics site, LyricsFind, “prohibiting the continued misappropriation of content from Genius’s website, including the licensing of such content to third parties, such as Google.” 

This will prove to be a difficult, but very interesting case.

[Via]

Hope is Doing it for the Culture on “Red Man” — Listen Now

By jessicabrant Word Is Bond

“Step up to the scene from a small rez town, they know I will never fail.” – “Never Fail” off Red Man

Hope is an indigenous MC representing one of the 56,000 Coast Salish people residing in the U.S. and on Canada’s West Coast. Following the traditional narrative of decline told by American history, the Coast Salish people were displaced when European settlers with religious interests seized the land. As a result, their languages, culture, and way of life deteriorated. In what they consider their most important work-to-date, Hope and his all-indigenous hip hop collective Status Krew, are juxtaposing their lives as modern indigenous men with the stories of their ancestors on the album, Red Man.

In the Storyhive visual created for Red Man, Hope is a displaced Native man wandering along the coast of an inlet village in Vancouver, British Columbia coping with the changes imposed by modern society on his once-familiar home. As he chants “red man” in an effort to reclaim ownership over this popularized epithet, his journey, he finds, doesn’t get any easier.

Over a ghostly trinket box melody, Hope broadcasts the harmful self-talk of two opposing identities, that of the indigenous man, and that of the “red man” living in modern culture. The video splits to images of dancing figures moving like skeletons in a closet. They are wearing masks typical of many ceremonial meetings in Coastal Salish culture.

“Rage” and “Life Givers” are the two songs that assert the indigenous man’s presence with the greatest lyrical force, creating a campaign that speaks to the larger focus of the project. Rage manifests in unhealthy ways on reservations, namely in violence against native women, which Hope speaks to on “Life Givers.” In some cases, women are murdered at ten times the national average. This is a persistent problem and is only getting worse for these indigenous communities. Without the lifelines of these tribes, language and culture will die. “Rage” offers the counterpoint — kill verses, not people.

Status Krew is in the company of other Canadian clubs that have spurred movements with their art, such as A Tribe Called Red and their youth culture movement, and MadChild’s biker-modeled positivity movement, Battle Axe Warriors. These movements seek to unify and empower that which is left of cultures once deemed invisible and to provide alternative coping mechanisms. Red Man is a genre-influencing project that is capable of doing the same.

 

Hope is Doing it for the Culture on “Red Man” — Listen Now

By jessicabrant Word Is Bond

“Step up to the scene from a small rez town, they know I will never fail.” – “Never Fail” off Red Man

Hope is an indigenous MC representing one of the 56,000 Coast Salish people residing in the U.S. and on Canada’s West Coast. Following the traditional narrative of decline told by American history, the Coast Salish people were displaced when European settlers with religious interests seized the land. As a result, their languages, culture, and way of life deteriorated. In what they consider their most important work-to-date, Hope and his all-indigenous hip hop collective Status Krew, are juxtaposing their lives as modern indigenous men with the stories of their ancestors on the album, Red Man.

In the Storyhive visual created for Red Man, Hope is a displaced Native man wandering along the coast of an inlet village in Vancouver, British Columbia coping with the changes imposed by modern society on his once-familiar home. As he chants “red man” in an effort to reclaim ownership over this popularized epithet, his journey, he finds, doesn’t get any easier.

Over a ghostly trinket box melody, Hope broadcasts the harmful self-talk of two opposing identities, that of the indigenous man, and that of the “red man” living in modern culture. The video splits to images of dancing figures moving like skeletons in a closet. They are wearing masks typical of many ceremonial meetings in Coastal Salish culture.

“Rage” and “Life Givers” are the two songs that assert the indigenous man’s presence with the greatest lyrical force, creating a campaign that speaks to the larger focus of the project. Rage manifests in unhealthy ways on reservations, namely in violence against native women, which Hope speaks to on “Life Givers.” In some cases, women are murdered at ten times the national average. This is a persistent problem and is only getting worse for these indigenous communities. Without the lifelines of these tribes, language and culture will die. “Rage” offers the counterpoint — kill verses, not people.

Status Krew is in the company of other Canadian clubs that have spurred movements with their art, such as A Tribe Called Red and their youth culture movement, and MadChild’s biker-modeled positivity movement, Battle Axe Warriors. These movements seek to unify and empower that which is left of cultures once deemed invisible and to provide alternative coping mechanisms. Red Man is a genre-influencing project that is capable of doing the same.

 

Whitney Peyton – “No Time”

As the 2nd half of the Winers Circle Tour approaches, Philly emcee Whitney Peyton is giving fans the 2nd single off her upcoming Suburban Noize Records debut Alpha dropping on January 24.

Post Malone Gets Chains Tested By Strangers For Authenticity: “It's All F*ckin' Diamonds!”

Post Malone ran into some a group of innovative young men outside the LA bar The Nice Guy on Wednesday night. The guys in question own a device that can determine whether or not a diamond is real, and offered to test out Posty’s diamond chains for authenticity. One of the men gave him a shining introduction on the video, calling him “one of the biggest artists in the world” and saying that “if you don’t know him, you’re probably living under a rock.” Before he and his buddies proceed to test the star’s jewelry, he mentions that they’re “continuing the series,” indicating that this is a regular activity that this team engages in, and we’re lowkey here for it.

Post gives a rundown of his diamonds, pointing out that his $250K Dallas Cowboys chain is made of “sapphires,” but later clarifies that the “baguettes” are diamonds—or should be. “Everything should be diamonds!” he declares, before admitting that he has no idea how much he paid for his pieces, only that they cost “more than my mama would like them to.” Finally, they get down to business, and with each of the gadget’s beeps confirming the authenticity of his ice, Post gets increasingly more thrilled. “We love it, we love it,” he says. “It’s all f*ckin diamonds.” Happy for you, Post.

Whitney Peyton – “No Time”

As the 2nd half of the Winers Circle Tour approaches, Philly emcee Whitney Peyton is giving fans the 2nd single off her upcoming Suburban Noize Records debut Alpha dropping on January 24.

Wishmaster drop visuals for “Science”

By teckzilla Word Is Bond

UK emcee Wishmaster drops the visuals for his previously released track titled “Science” taken from his album Boom Bap To The Future. The spacey track produced by THE WARTHOG has a smooth moody texture laced with head-nodding grooves to match Wishmaster’s effortless flow and poignant lyrics on life as an artist who has mastered his craft. The visual directed by Joseph James takes the theme of breaking the norm with its blend of homely aesthetics and entrancing storyline which follows Wishmaster from his grandma’s living room to the moon.

Boom Bap To The Future is available in limited edition double vinyl, but only a few remain! Do the math, stream ‘Science’ everywhere now.

 

Keep up with  Wishmaster | Soundcloud: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram

Whitney Peyton – “No Time”

As the 2nd half of the Winers Circle Tour approaches, Philly emcee Whitney Peyton is giving fans the 2nd single off her upcoming Suburban Noize Records debut Alpha dropping on January 24.

Botanik drops new EP ‘Mythology’

By teckzilla Word Is Bond

Denver-based producer Botanik ends the year with a 10 track beat tape titled ‘Mythology.’ The body of work is a fusion of many musical styles ranging from classic soul, lo-fi hip-hop and jazz as well. The project starts with the mellow, reflective “Lucid” which ushers the listener into Botanik’s world. “Head Stash” has a woozy, atmospheric vibe while tracks like “Folklore” and “Leisure” offer different vibes from choppy samples to dreamy textures that would keep the head nodding. While most of the project is all instrumental, 2 tracks do feature vocals from rapper Chester Watson. The rapper appears on both “High Tide” and “Sails” delivering his unique, off-kilter nonchalant flows. The project ends with “Domicile” and “Moxy” with their sobering vibes.

Hit the play button and get familiar.

 

Keep up with   Botanik | Soundcloud:  Instagram and Twitter.

French Montana & Juicy J Have "50's and 100's"

French Montana does a decent job of emulating Juicy J’s flow on “50’s and 100’s.” The single is featured on French’s latest album, Montana. “50’s and 100’s” sounds like it should just be a Juicy J song because the veteran steals the show on the third verse. Still, French does bless fans with a catchy chorus and memorable verses. His imitation of Juicy gives French a chance to rap differently, a task that he completes satisfactorily. 

Juicy J obliterates the third verse and reminds us that he has bars too. Of course, the instrumental is also crafted by Juicy, so it makes sense that he would take off on the track. Somber yet hopefully piano riffs dominate the beat, but its the ad-libs mixed into the background that really turn “50’s and 100’s” into a turn-up track. 

Quotable Lyrics
Never send a boy to do a man’s job
If it was me, I would’ve left him with a headshot
How the fuck you get your own mans robbed?
Before you see me again, you get that red dot
I will not stop, fuck the opp cops
And whoever fuck with ’em, we cannot rock
I will not stop, even if that block hotter
Than my mama be up in the kitchen with that crock pot 

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